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Version: 7.x

Basics

Deployer has two main concepts: hosts and tasks.

A recipe is a file containing definitions for hosts and tasks.

Deployer CLI requires two arguments to run: a task to run and a host or group of hosts.

$ dep deploy deployer.org
--- ------ ------------
| | |
| | `--- The host
| `------------- The task
`------------------ The CLI

Then Deployer takes the given task, performs some preparation (described later), and executes the task on all specified hosts.

The dep CLI looks for deploy.php or deploy.yaml file in current directory.

Or recipe can be specified explicitly via -f or --file option.

$ dep --file=deploy.php deploy deployer.org

Let's write a recipe.

// We are going to use functions declared primarily in Deployer namespace,
// to simplify recipe we will use Deployer namespace too. Alternativly,
// you can import individual functions via "use function".
namespace Deployer;

host('deployer.org');

task('my_task', function () {
run('whoami');
});

Let's try to run our task on deployer.org.

$ dep my_task
task my_task
$

If no host provided, Deployer will show an interactive prompt for selecting hosts. If your recipe contains only one host, Deployer will automatically choose it. To select all hosts specify all.

But where is our whoami command output? By default, Deployer runs with normal verbosity level and shows only names of executed tasks. Let's increase verbosity to verbose, and rerun our task.

Add -v option to increase verbosity. Read more about CLI usage.

$ dep my_task -v
task my_task
[deployer.org] run whoami
[deployer.org] deployer
$

Now let's add second host:

host('deployer.org');
host('medv.io');

How does Deployer know how to connect to a host? It uses same ~/.ssh/config file as the ssh command. Alternatively, you can specify connection options in recipe.

Let's run my_task task on both hosts:

$ dep my_task -v all
task my_task
[deployer.org] run whoami
[medv.io] run whoami
[medv.io] anton
[deployer.org] deployer

Deployer runs a task in parallel on each host. This is why the output is mixed. We can limit it to run only one host.

$ dep my_task -v all --limit 1
task my_task
[deployer.org] run whoami
[deployer.org] deployer
[medv.io] run whoami
[medv.io] deployer

Limit level also possible to specified per task.

Each host has a configuration: a list of key-value pairs. Let's define our first configuration option for both our hosts:

host('deployer.org')
->set('my_config', 'foo');
host('medv.io')
->set('my_config', 'bar');

In the task we can get current executing host with currentHost function:

task('my_task', function () {
$myConfig = currentHost()->get('my_config');
writeln("my_config: " . $myConfig);
});

Or with get function:

task('my_task', function () {
- $myConfig = currentHost()->get('my_config');
+ $myConfig = get('my_config');
writeln("my_config: " . $myConfig);
});

Or via parse function which replaces brackets {{ ... }} and value with of config option.

All functions (writeln, run, runLocally, cd, upload, etc) call parse function internally. So you don't need to call parse function by your self.

task('my_task', function () {
- $myConfig = get('my_config');
- writeln("my_config: " . $myConfig);
+ writeln("my_config: {{my_config}}");
});

Let's try to run our task:

$ dep my_task all
task my_task
[deployer.org] my_config: foo
[medv.io] my_config: bar

Awesome! Each host configuration inherits global configuration. Let's refactor our recipe to define one global config option:

set('my_config', 'global');

host('deployer.org');
host('medv.io');

The config option my_config will be equal to global on both hosts.

Also, config option value can be specified as a callback, such callback executed on first access and returned result saved in host configuration.

set('whoami', function () {
return run('whoami');
});

task('my_task', function () {
writeln('Who am I? {{whoami}}');
});

Let's try to run it:

$ dep my_task all
task my_task
[deployer.org] Who am I? deployer
[medv.io] Who am I? anton

We can use this to create dynamic configuration which uses current host information.

Only the first call will trigger the callback execution. All subsequent checks use saved value.

Here is an example:

set('current_date', function () {
return run('date');
});

task('my_task', function () {
writeln('What time is it? {{current_date}}');
run('sleep 5');
writeln('What time is it? {{current_date}}');
});

If we run my_task we will see that date is called only once on {{current_date}} access.

$ dep my_task deployer.org -v
task my_task
[deployer.org] run date
[deployer.org] Wed 03 Nov 2021 01:16:53 PM UTC
[deployer.org] What time is it? Wed 03 Nov 2021 01:16:53 PM UTC
[deployer.org] run sleep 5
[deployer.org] What time is it? Wed 03 Nov 2021 01:16:53 PM UTC

We can override a config option via CLI option -o like this:

$ dep my_task deployer.org -v -o current_date="I don't know"
task my_task
[deployer.org] What time is it? I don't know
[deployer.org] run sleep 5
[deployer.org] What time is it? I don't know

Since the current_date config option is overridden there is no need to call the callback. So there is no 'run date'.



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